What are holed Seated Liberty coins worth?

Forum for Liberty Seated Quarter questions, hosted by Coinosauras
wball64
Member
Joined: 11 Aug 2015, 02:21

13 Jun 2017, 18:33 #1

The text book answer is don't mess with problem coins.

I have seen numerous seated quarters and other seated coins with holes on eBay.

What are they worth? Melt or a percentage of a coin without issues? Does it matter if the seated quarter is a key date like the 1870-CC or 1871-CC, a semi key, or common date? Does condition other the hole matter?
Everything seems to have it's price. If I had an XF details 1871-CC quarter and it was holed, at what point would someone want it, even for a conversation piece?
What are your thoughts?

Walt
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John Okerson
Collector
Joined: 12 Jun 2014, 21:54

13 Jun 2017, 23:26 #2

There is at least coin dealer who sells holed US coins.  He has been in the business a good while and his prices on what I term impaired coins is high - many times very high.  His site is holeduscoins.com.  Jim is a very nice fellow and he and I share several areas of interest - Reeded Edge Half Dollars and Bust half dimes and dimes in particular.  What I have purchased from him were unimpaired coins.  He has a nice selection of varieties, particularly among the Bust pieces.  His particular intent is to sell VF grade coins with a hole at or near 12 o'clock, but that doesn't always come true.  Checking on his Seated Liberty Quarters, he doesn't show any particularly rare pieces.  Looking at Seated Liberty Dimes, he offers an 1860-O EF40 holed for $1400 and a fair selection of other dates at prices from $10-$114.  Seated Liberty Halves are similar $16-$438. His only listed Seated Liberty Dollar is an 1842 VG-10 holed at $205.

Decide for yourself what such a piece might be worth.  If you are a date and mintmark collector and he has the exact piece you want at a price you feel appropriate, then you should give it consideration.  I have an 18th-century Large cent with a hole in it which I wore around my neck with my dog tags while in the military.

Consider shopping on your own and see what you can buy and for what price before you cast aspersions at someone.  Be sure to look at his collection of Reeded Edge Halves by variety - AMAZING!

John
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wball64
Member
Joined: 11 Aug 2015, 02:21

14 Jun 2017, 18:21 #3

John,

Thanks for your insight on these. I went to the website you referenced. Some of his coins were amazing!
Thanks.

Walt
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frosty
Member
Joined: 05 Sep 2014, 13:39

14 Jun 2017, 23:38 #4

The rarer the coin, the higher someone's pain limit will be to get it, as they can be really neat pieces and it might be the only way some folks can acquire certain dates (I will not say "fill the hole" Image).  The neatest quarter I never saw was a mint state 1873-CC Arrows, with a perfect small hole drilled at 12:00.  It brought several thousand dollars at auction.  It's been years.  I would guess it's probably been repaired, and who knows, it could be in an MS63 holder by now!  Another very rare piece is the choice AU 1851 Seated dollar, with a hole.  What a neat coin that was!  Still worth five figures.
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rhedden
Expert Collector
Joined: 18 Aug 2007, 01:26

15 Jun 2017, 00:11 #5

Having sold several badly impaired Seated coins in past years, here's my advice.  Don't buy holed common dates unless they're dirt cheap.  They will be difficult to sell.  There is a market for holed or damaged rare dates, but mostly for the coins that are so expensive that they are unaffordable in problem-free, lower grades.  If a collector has a choice between a problem-free G4 and a holed VF for the same money, many will take the G4.  Thus, we are talking about quarters like 1870-cc, 1871-cc, and 1873-cc being marketable in holed condition.  Even so, these coins may take a while to sell, and they inevitably go to a collector on a budget... so don't expect a strong sale price or a quick sale.
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wball64
Member
Joined: 11 Aug 2015, 02:21

15 Jun 2017, 01:30 #6

Good point Rhedden. I always purchase coins with the thought of what would happen if I chose to sell it down the road. I typically don't purchase holed coins.

I brought up this topic because there is currently a quarter on the Bay that the condition without the hole is a R-5+ rarity in Brigg's book. Was trying to determine what might be "dirt cheap" for the coin. 🤔

Walt
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rhedden
Expert Collector
Joined: 18 Aug 2007, 01:26

15 Jun 2017, 01:54 #7

If it's the 1849-O with the large, ugly hole, I'd pass on it. An 1849-O with VF or better details, and a small, neatly drilled hole, would be a salable item. The 1849-O that I saw on there this evening has a gaping, awful hole, and the coin would not be all that nice without the hole.
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wball64
Member
Joined: 11 Aug 2015, 02:21

15 Jun 2017, 03:25 #8

Thanks for the advice. No. It's not the 1849-O. That one does look rough.
I'm​ watching a different date. Will watch it for a few days.... it looks alot better. I already have one of this different date without issues in low grade. Conditional rarity caught my attention.

Thanks.

Walt
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wball64
Member
Joined: 11 Aug 2015, 02:21

15 Jun 2017, 12:49 #9

Rhedden,
The date on the Bay is 1847-O. Seller says has XF details.

Walt
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John Okerson
Collector
Joined: 12 Jun 2014, 21:54

15 Jun 2017, 15:28 #10

The 1847-O does NOT have its hole at 12 o'clock but has some interesting lines on the upper reverse. Clearly, an unimpaired coin is valuable, but had I been a bidder - which I am not - I would have topped out at about $20. As suggested, I would be happier with a G6 at CDN price of $80.

John
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